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the speech. something we'll be discussing later with john lewis. it's an added emotional contact. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. f
serve. that's why we're here. ♪ >>> the president's nominee to run the state department, senator john kerry, faced questions before the senate foreign relations committee this week. during his opening remarks, he was interrupted by an anti-war protester, which triggered this personal reply. >> when i first came to washington to testify, i obviously was testifying as part of a group of people who came here to have their voices heard. and that is above all what this place is about. >> nearly 42 years ago, it was kerry who aimed to have his voice heard when he first appeared on capitol hill not as a politician but as a protester. the year, 1971. he was part of an anti-war group testifying before that very committee. but it was days before on this program where kerry gave the country its first look at a future leader. and it's this morning's "meet the press" moment. >> we are down here to demand that those who call themselves the most committed of all in this country, namely the senators and congressmen, who have been talking peace for the past few years, that these men exercise their res
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)

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